Sedating anti depressants

6854933580_2c8b688306_z

There are differences between SSRIs that could be clinically significant.Also, SSRIs have very different molecular structures. Zoloft (Sertraline hydrochloride) was the second SSRI to come to market in the United States, and it was approved by the FDA in December 30, 1991. Paxil (Paroxetine hydrochloride) was the third SSRI to come to market in the United States and was approved by the FDA in December 29, 1992. Chemical structure of Paroxetine differs from other SSRIs by having a piperidine ring.The first drug in the SSRI class was Prozac (Fluoxetine), which hit the United States market in 1987. Luvox (Fluvoxamine maleate) was the next SSRI FDA approved in December 05, 1994.However, now its marketing status is "Discontinued".Celexa (Citalopram hydrobromide) was approved by the FDA in July 17, 1998.Celexa is manufactured by Forest Pharmaceuticals, Inc.Antidepressants are prescribed most often for clinical depression and severe cases of depression.

The strategy behind rational drug development is to design a new drug that is capable of affecting a specific neural site of action (eg, uptake pumps, receptors) while avoiding effects on other site of actions.Early treatment can help to ensure treatment success.Be sure your doctor knows if you have had times where you felt a reduced need for sleep in combination with an unusual amount of energy, or where your mood changed from feeling depressed to feeling unusually happy or irritable.People who are severely depressed or anxious for a long time may feel they should be able to shake it off, and so don’t seek treatment. If you are distressed for more than two weeks by feelings of sadness, despair and hopelessness, or by excessive worry that is hard to control, see a doctor for an assessment of your symptoms and situation and to discuss treatment and support options.Many people who are treated for depression or anxiety recover and never require treatment again. For this reason, the medication trial should probably be initiated with a very low dose -- as little as 10 to 25 milligrams (mg) per day of imipramine, for example. Typically taken in one dose at bedtime, but can be divided. Use during pregnancy or breast-feeding only after approval from your physician. Headache, drowsiness, dizziness, nervousness, trouble sleeping, dry mouth, nausea, vomiting, blurred vision, altered taste, sweating, stomach upset, constipation, loss of appetite, anxiety, or yawning may occur.

You must have an account to comment. Please register or login here!